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Get true answers from experts in Genetic Disorders.
Fatal Familial Insomnia is a very rare genetic prion disease that only afflicts 40 families worldwide. This disease targets the thalamus, a part of the brain that regulates sleep. FFI starts with the typical insomnia that gradually worsens to a point that a person completely loses the ability to sleep. Lack of sleep for months leads to severe health decline and death.
Published by Cristina Mergas 61 months ago in Genetic Disorders | +7 votes | 8 comments
Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder that rapidly accelerates the aging process in children eight to times faster. The average life expectancy for the children with Progeria is about 13 years old. Mortality rate is largely due to complications such as heart attacks and strokes brought about by atherosclerosis.Progeria is caused by a mutated gene that is a result of a sporadic new mutation. There is still no 100% cure for Progeria but current clinical drug trials have s...
Published by Cristina Mergas 61 months ago in Genetic Disorders | +4 votes | 3 comments
What are the current therapies that are available for people with genetic disorders? This article covers some of the most prominent therapies currently being used or tested in the lab. These are promising and the article goes more in depth of what is being done today. As well the article lists what genetic disorders are already being treated.
Published by Nora Arnold 64 months ago in Genetic Disorders | +0 votes | 0 comments
Mental disorders are medical conditions that disrupt a person's thinking, feeling, mood, ability to relate to others and daily functioning. There are a variety of mental illnesses that are found in a large portion of the population, and each type of disorder can be found in every country throughout the world. Some of the mental illnesses consist of Bipolar disorder, Schizophrenia, eating disorders, Major Depression Disorder, etc.
Published by Dylan Gonzales 64 months ago in Genetic Disorders | +0 votes | 0 comments
If you could possibly have a debilitating genetic disease would you want to know? With today's advancing technology it is easier than ever to code your DNA and look for certain diseases. But is knowing you have it better than not knowing. This article looks at several genetic diseases that are able to be seen early on and discusses the pros and cons to knowing you will develop a possible life-threatening condition.
Published by Nora Arnold 64 months ago in Genetic Disorders | +0 votes | 0 comments
There are is a lot of pressure to have healthy, smart, and happy kids. There is new technology and methods to ensure certain traits in our kids before they are born. Such methods, specifically Pre Implantation Genetic Disorder, have a lot of potential for both physical and health benefits. This does, however prove to be quite controversial.
Published by Arielle Canoza 64 months ago in Genetic Disorders | +0 votes | 0 comments
Neurofibromatosis is a genetic disorder that causes malfunction in nerve cells due to tumor growth. This may lead to devastating health issues where one is incapable of controlling the muscles in their face, able to walk, or stop pain caused by nerves that malfunction. With more research and time this disorder might be able to be stopped once more is known about the chromosome function with protein release.
Published by Cassandra Hernandez 64 months ago in Genetic Disorders | +0 votes | 0 comments
This article highlights some of the importance of knowing the genomic sequences of humans and other model organisms as well. The topic of interest lies in the impact the studies of genetic mechanisms in other organisms can have on human health. This article also describes current methods of regulating genes and potential future methods as well.
Published by Roque Troz 64 months ago in Genetic Disorders | +1 votes | 0 comments
Around 5 to 6 million years around the last common ancestor between humans and chimpanzees roamed the Earth. Since then, genetic differences have resulted by mutations that have occurred in each lineage. Through genome sequencing techniques researchers and scientists have estimated 35 million single-nucleotide variances between chimpanzees and humans or about a 1.06 percent degree of divergence. In addition, the proteins encoded by these genomes are very similar and most of the proteins that di...
Published by Kristen Aceves 64 months ago in Genetic Disorders | +0 votes | 0 comments
Genetic mutation isn't all bad. There are some benefits to mutations. Some cases it can work as a positive effect and protect us from another incoming threat such as a super virus or a deadly bacterial infection. It can also be harmful and kill us from the inside out because we can’t stop genetic mutation from giving us cancer 100% most of the time. At least we can find out why mutations can help us in a rare way so that we don’t think that its 100% negative.
Published by Victor Ly 65 months ago in Genetic Disorders | +0 votes | 1 comments
There was a study conducted on mice to test this theory. The study found that premature aging could be reversed by reactivating an enzyme that protects the ends of the chromosomes. In the laboratory, mice that were engineered to lack telomerase aged prematurely. However, they seemed to become healthier when telomerase was replaced. Essentially, it was hinted that some disorders characterized by a premature aging phenotype could potentially be treated by boosting telomerase activity. There is als...
Published by Kristen Aceves 65 months ago in Genetic Disorders | +0 votes | 0 comments
Some geneticists have even found evidence through studying human diseases that lead to a premature-aging phenotype. For example, people that have been diagnosed with Werner syndrome experience the early onset of many age-related issues (wrinkling of the dermis, cataracts, osteoporosis, white hair, and heart issues). Delving into the more chemical aspects of this, genetic and biochemical studies have discovered that people with Werner Syndrome have shorter telomeres than people that are not affl...
Published by Kristen Aceves 65 months ago in Genetic Disorders | +0 votes | 0 comments
In this article, we will talk about the genetic causes of hearing impairment, mainly focusing on newborns. This article will also talk about the specific vocabulary associated with the impairment. For example, the difference between a familial disorder or a sporadic disorder. We will also go in depth with the genes that affect the development of the cochlea.
Published by Teranze Lam 66 months ago in Genetic Disorders | +0 votes | 0 comments
Fuchs endothelial dystrophy is an eye disease that is not easy to detect. Up till a few years ago, many people had this disease and did not know because doctors did not possess the equipment needed to test for it. Now, people are able to catch the eye disease in its early stages, before they lose too much of their vision.
Published by Sharifa Sanderson 66 months ago in Genetic Disorders | +1 votes | 0 comments
In normal human sexes, the female sex chromosomes are XX and the male sex chromosomes are XY. Since males only have one X chromosome, any gene on the X chromosome (even those that are recessive in females) will be expressed in the male. In Humans, the female population acquires two copies of every gene on the X chromosome and the males only acquire one (there are exception in regard to pseudoautosomal genes and the relatively few “housekeeping” genes on the Y chromosome).
Published by Kristen Aceves 66 months ago in Genetic Disorders | +0 votes | 0 comments
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